Art Process: From Watercolour illustrations to Garden Journal

Art, Creative life, illustration, Sustainable design

Hi all,

I’m going to be sharing more of my art-making and design process here, as well as my tips for anyone who’s interested.

My Patrons get full details on the process as it happens, as well as invitations for their input, and my newsletter gives a monthly run-down of the best bits as well as a heads-up on when things will be available to purchase in my shop.

I’ll be using this space to curate the processes of my most interesting and juiciest projects, and sharing any experience that I think may come in handy to anyone else. I know I’m always eager to see the design process of other illustrators, out of curiosity and to see if I can pick up any useful tips.

I’ll start with my pocket Garden Journal. This was a self-initiated project that I made basically because I wanted to use it myself!

Run-down of Development Steps

  • Pencil thumbnails and brainstorming ideas
Scribbly first ideas in my notebook, with teeny tiny thumbnai ideas
  • Watercolour spot illustrations, then scanned and digitally cleaned up
Cleaned up bird-feeder spot illo
  • Each page made up and imported into a digital page template
  • Mini thumbnails of all finished pages, placed in a layout overview document
Mini layout of thumbnails for an easy overview, to check it all works together
  • All pages assembled in a multi-page PDF template, then sent to the printers

Tips / Notes to Self

// A thumbnail overview is useful~ Even a ‘blank’ journal has a sequential layout that requires pacing. A zoomed-out overview lets you check out that colour-schemes and page layouts all have room to breath and are varied enough to be interesting. Especially with so many pages (mine has 44); that’s a lot of room for error!

// Leave lots of time for a multi-page project~ Give yourself a roomy deadline. I knew what I wanted for the finished journal from the start, as gardening is also my hobby, but if it had been an unfamiliar subject I’d have needed a way longer planning and research stage. I’m also naturally bad at time-management so I had to have a lot of patience when things took longer than I initially anticipated. On top of that it was also a new document format, being so many pages, in a publishing program that I have barely used. Patience!

// Ask for a proof version if you have time~ I DID actually go for a proof this time, and in the end it wasn’t needed. I ended up making no changes. I think this was down to luck though, and the fact I was making up a booklet to my own requirements. If it had been a commission, or anything with any word count at all (I think this journal has maybe 60 words in it, mostly on the back), then I’d definitely double check before approving the full run. These things cost money, especially with the cost of paper these days, and it’s just not worth throwing your money away. Enquire with your printers, if your print run is large enough then they may be willing to throw in a physical proof print for free.

This journal was certainly a challenge, and if you’re thinking of making up your first illustrated book I’d definitely recommend starting with a familiar subject matter as an anchor to grow your skills around.

If you have any questions, or there’s an aspect you’d like further explanation of, then feel free to comment below!

L

Here’s to a Happy and Healthy 2021!

Creative life, indie business, Sustainable design

I’m crossing my fingers and toes that this year is a steadier ride for everyone than the last.

My business couldn’t have made it through 2020 without the amazing support and encouragement from you, so a big thanks to everyone who bought anything, pledged to my Patreon (Patrons are superstars: without them I’d have thrown in the towel last year for certain), and those who shared, simply ‘liked’ or commented on my stuff on social media. All very important support, thank you. I was able to launch a Patreon page, invest and test new products, invest in a new graphics programme (Affinity Designer) to streamline my work, and even take a bit of time to dabble in some personal sketches. I feel like I could get my business affairs a bit more in order, finally!

I’m also here to mention that I also have plans for this year. How fast I can roll them out depends on what happens with the latest lockdown, and when my son can go back to childcare, and also my therapy schedule. I think we’ve all learnt to be a bit more flexible over the last year though, so I’m sure I can re-jig and fit most of my plans in if needs be.

I have a few new products sat here waiting to be assembled, photographed and listed, which I’m already proud of even if no-one else is interested in them. I already plan to use some of them myself.

On the ‘sustainability’ front I’m also dipping my toes in with a local supplier who hold themselves accountable when it comes to the environment. I’ll be trying new cards and textile products this month, actually.

Stay tuned, and have a good ‘un,

Laura x

International Women’s Day 2020

Art, Creative life, illustration, Markets and events, Sustainable design, Uncategorized

We celebrated women of all kinds yesterday, with another successful and fun International Women’s Day fair!

Organised by the C.L.O Eindhoven and held at the Parktheater Eindhoven, it was a lovely and vibrant event as always.

Full of interesting conversation and women entrepreneurs (plus their families who are always welcome), it is a celebration of women, and promoting gender equality. I definitely recommend coming down next year, whether you’re a woman or not!

Here’s a selection of what was to see and do-

Plus if you’re a female entrepreneur, it’s a great chance to meet with other like-minded women. Thanks for all who came down, and for your kind words and support for my own small business!

Eco paper + Print Sale!

Art, Creative life, illustration, Sustainable design

I’ve always been committed to running my business and making art in the most ‘eco-friendly’ way possible (read more here). ‘Eco-friendly’ is a bit of a blanket term, but I think it’s important for all makers to take in to consideration, no matter what your budget-limitations or what products you make. It’s a tough and on-going challenge, but I beleive even small improvements to processes or materials will help.

One of the recent changes I’ve made is to my paper choice for my prints.

First I tried switching over to recycled, uncoated paper. Still on my beautiful ‘photolitho’ printer the prints were subpar, muted and undefined. Such a disappointment! I had desperately wanted this to be the solution, but I am also committed to producing reproductions that do the originals justice. Another aspect of sustainability that I value is ‘quality’. Better to buy one beautiful, archival print and have it hang for decades, rather than chucking it in the bin after a month. At least in my book.

Biotop v regular fineart print paper

Look at how vibrant the left-hand prints are, on my usual paper! I wouldn’t have been happy selling the prints on the recycled paper, seen on the right. It might have worked for a different style of illustration, or something where a warm muted look was required, but certainly not for these.

After that disappointment I spent ages trying to research quality paper for prints that have at least a nod to decent environmental standards. Let me tell you, that’s very difficult.

At last I settled on Hahnemuhle fine art paper. I was a bit reckless and didn’t even try a sample, just went straight out and bought a whole pack (hello €€€). I’m so glad I did!

The results are gorgeous, vibrant and of decent giclee quality with a watercolour paper texture.

 

Hahnemuhle were one of the few companies that I came across that have a fairly transparent breakdown of their efforts to be ‘eco-friendly’. You can read more here.

// SALE! //

To mark my success with another step in my ongoing ‘sustainability’ journey I’m running a sale on all prints in my Etsy shop! All prints will have 20% off (discount already applied) running today till 3rd December, yay! I’m making way for all prints going forward to be on the Hahnemuhle paper. My existing prints in the sale are also vibrant and on beautiful heavyweight paper, don’t worry!

I’ve also added my Christmas section goodies into the sale, as I’d like them to find new homes so I can make some more :*

 

 

 

 

Yksi Expo EHV- Sustainable Design

Art, Creative life, illustration, Sustainable design, Uncategorized

Me and the fam took a little trip to Yksi Expo, situated in Strijp, Eindhoven. It focuses on circular and sustainable design.

Seeing as sustainable design is a passion of mine in my daily life, and an aim in my business one, I’ve been interested in seeing this space. It’s worth a visit if you’re down in Strijp S.

There is also a lovely little shop (full of sustainable and zero-waste products of course), and a little cafe called Tea Stories. BTW they sell really good gluten-free (and I noticed also vegan) chocolate cake!

We stocked up on lentils in our re-usable organza bag. You can bulk-buy pasta and other dried goods here.

If you want to get involved in the circular design/zero waste scene in Eindhoven, they are holding an end-of-summer party on Aug 31st. You can contact them here to find out more and get tickets.

Strijp itself is a good location for sketching, though I don’t get out there as often as I’d like to do that. Managed to do a quick little one, with my little one, baby Q, in tow.

I’m planning some more products with upcycled fabrics, which is a good way to cut waste. I’ll keep you updated!

Laura